NEW ROOF PROJECT IMPROVES QUALITY OF LIVING AT FAMILIES IN TRANSITION FACILITY

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 28, 2012
For more information, contact: Michele Talwani – 603.641.9441 ext. 239


PHOTO: NEW ROOF PROVIDES IMPROVED ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND COMFORT:
Pictured (l. to r. front) are Families in Transition (FIT) President, Maureen Beauregard and FIT Project Manager, Darren Finch with construction workers on the roof of FIT’s Millyard I Housing Facility in downtown Manchester. A new roof on the building will improve living quality for its tenants and the building’s energy efficiency. The project is funded by the Samuel P. Hunt Foundation and the Enterprise Energy Fund administered by the New Hampshire Community Loan Fund. (Photo courtesy: Kate Harris Photography)

A New Roof Improves Energy Conservation at Families in Transition’s Millyard I Building

MANCHESTER, NH – Families in Transition (FIT), a Manchester and Concord-based homelessness nonprofit, began a construction project that will make substantial energy improvements to its Millyard I facility located at 106 Market Street in Manchester. The facility will be reroofed with insulated panels; which will improve the air flow, be warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer for tenants within the building and lower energy costs for FIT. The estimated total cost of this project is $132,000. Funding for this project was made possible through the Samuel P. Hunt Foundation and the Enterprise Energy Fund administered by the New Hampshire Community Loan Fund.

The energy efficiency project primarily involves the installation of a sealed and insulated building envelope including new roof shingles and gutter system on the Millyard I building, which houses 12 apartments for formerly homeless individuals and families, and FIT administrative offices. The building envelope serves as a barrier between indoor and outdoor air, allowing for the stability and maintenance of the indoor environment. Climate control is better regulated with the barrier of an envelope as it provides continuous air infiltration. The project has an environmental impact with long-term benefits for Families in Transition. Energy waste and damage to the environment will be greatly reduced with less greenhouse gas emissions from the new roof.

According to FIT President Maureen Beauregard, “The project will undoubtedly produce better living conditions for the 25 tenants, while at the same time reduce annual energy costs for the organization as well. We’ll be able to redirect the savings produced by this project to continue providing programming and services to our participants, and possibly even more energy improvement projects in the future.”

Community Loan Fund President Juliana Eades said the ability to help nonprofits like FIT operate more effectively and efficiently, while also conserving resources, was the impetus behind her organization’s involvement in the energy-efficiency financing program.

The Enterprise Energy Fund is a revolving loan fund that helps businesses and nonprofits finance projects that reduce energy costs and consumption and promote economic recovery and job creation. It is administered jointly by the New Hampshire Community Loan Fund and the New Hampshire Community Development Finance Authority (CDFA) with technical expertise provided by The Jordan Institute. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding is provided through the New Hampshire Office of Energy and Planning-State Energy program.

Families in Transition is a nonprofit organization that provides safe, affordable housing and comprehensive social services to individuals and families who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless, enabling them to gain self-sufficiency and respect. FIT also owns and operates two thrift stores in Manchester and Concord, NH, as well as a newly established commercial cleaning company, all of which serve as economic engines to help pay for services that FIT provides. For more information about FIT, the stores, and the commercial cleaning company visit www.fitnh.org or call 603-641-9441.

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